Person centred practice support the individual to plan their own life

Person centred practice support the individual to plan their own life, enjoy a lifestyle of their own choosing, and construct services to meet these individual needs rather than fitting individuals into existing services that may not meet their individual needs.

Critically review approaches to Person -centred practice

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The Medical Model of Disability prioritises the individual’s medical diagnoses or illness. It places control with the medical practitioners, other professionals and carers and not on the individual. It labels an individual and care is provided based on that label and not on the individual’s preferences or personal needs. While it may keep the individual safe and physically healthy, it does not meet their overall wellbeing.

The Social Model of Disability prioritises the individuals own wishes, needs and allows them to be central to the process of panning, looking at their overall life and will then works towards minimising the negative and increase the positive factors.
This can be very empowering and positive for the individual, but outcomes can take a long time to achieve and sometimes there are issues that require immediate outcomes, such as health issues.

To address this, we also use other person-centred practices.
In my workplace we also use Community Living Skills Baseline Assessing. This looks at the individual’s current skills and abilities and highlights where support is required.
This leads to a Person-Centred Planning meeting where the individual and appropriate partners look to provide appropriate support to meet these assessed needs.
Both approaches look to empower the individual in their lifestyle and support needs, and through using both safeties can be maintained and development in life achieved in ways that meet the needs and desires of the individual.

Analyse the effect of Legislation and Policy on Person Centred Practice

Legislation and Policy effects person centred practice in my workplace our Service Minimum Standards Policy.
States the need for person centred planning, so I am required to demonstrate that it is in place and part of everyday working practice.
This means that person centred planning is not optional – it is a statutory requirement of the workplace and all workplace practices must be able to demonstrate and support it.
This basically means that it has become a ‘way of life’ for service users and they have increased and improved expectations as a result. It is also used by Staff as a basis for everyday practice and helps to improve consistency and appropriateness of care and support

Explain how Person-centred practice informs the way in which consent is established with individuals

Person centred practice informs the way in which consent is established with individuals by ensuring that they are involved in the decision-making process, that they are provided with information in a manner that allows them to make informed choices.
This may be verbally, visually or in the manner most appropriate to the individual, their consent can be recorded by signing if they are able or by having it recorded and signed by the partnership group as given.

We have a Capacity Assessment that is used to determine the individual’s ability to make informed decisions. Should this not be the case then a ‘Best Interest Decision’ Agreement is drawn up and is completed by those involved in partnership working with the individual.
Consent given relates only to the specific and agreed action.
It is also stated in our Capacity Guidance that the individual has the right to change their mind or withdraw consent at any time.

Explain how Person-centred practice can result in positive changes in the individuals lives

Person centred practice can result in positive changes in the individuals lives by supporting the individual to enjoy a lifestyle of their own choosing, and construct services to meet these individual needs rather than fitting individuals into existing services that may not meet these individual needs.

Be able to lead a person-centred practice

Support others to work with individuals to establish their history, preferences, wishes and needs

To support others to work with individuals to establish their history, preferences, wishes and needs, I organise Person Centred Planning meetings, where the above is discussed and recorded. These include Skills, Needs and Risk assessment document, Health Assessments, Self-Medication Assessments, Communication Assessments and Support plans and Risk assessments that meet the needs of the individual service user after attending a course on facilitating on 04/09/2013 I facilitate these meetings to ensure they remain person centred.

Support others implement person centred practice

To support others, implement person centred practice I ensure through the person-centred planning process that each service user has a Health Passport
These documents are done through person centred planning meetings and contain information to assist others to be able to support the individual.
The health passport is taken with the service user to all health-related appointments to provide information as to the levels of support required, what I like to be called, how medication is to be given, support needed for blood tests etc, food preferences, communication methods, general likes and dislikes, and topics of conversation.

Support others to work with individuals and review approaches to meet individuals needs and preferences

I support others to work with individuals and review approaches to meet individual’s needs and preferences through the person-centred planning process. Which are held on a minimum of two a year, previously agreed actions/goals and approaches are reviewed, and feedback is sought to see if they are achieving the desired positive outcomes.

Support others to work with individuals to adapt approaches in response to individuals emerging needs or preferences

I support others to work with individuals to adapt approaches in response to individuals emerging needs or preferences through the person-centred planning process.
After the initial assessment agreed action/goals outcomes are reviewed to measure success, and where necessary they are adapted and changed to reflect changing needs/preferences of the individual service user. This is achieved through effective person-centred planning and partnership work.

Be able to lead the implementation of active participation of individuals

Evaluate how active participation enhances the well-being and quality of lives of individuals

Active participation enhances the well-being and quality of lives of individuals in many ways. Active participation is central to person centred practice as individual’s participation in planning their own life leads lead to greater self-esteem and confidence. It also promotes respect amongst others through positive outcomes and can lead to changes in services so that they match an individual’s needs rather than operational requirements.
Active social participation within the community can lead to acceptance and respect, seeing that people with disabilities have the right to inclusion and have a part to play in the community.
Having a social presence in the community has been known to help reduce the risk of abuse, rather than being isolated

Implement systems and processes that promote active participation

I implement systems and processes that through the person-centred planning where support plans and risk assessments are put in place at the service users’ level of ability to promote active participation, this may be as simple as choosing which cereal to eat at breakfast, or what to wear that day.

Support the use of risk assessments to promote active participation in all aspects of lives of the individuals

I support the use of risk assessments to promote active participation in all aspects of lives of the individuals through Person Centred Planning meetings. Here items such as financial risk assessments are discussed and agreed. They assess the individual’s ability to manage and take responsibility for their own lives, and the levels of support that are required to minimise risk. However, in line with Adult Services Minimum Standards, a positive attitude towards risk taking is encouraged. Even though an individual may not be demonstrating the ability to be independent in certain areas such as finance, it may be their wish to have some control. As such the risk assessment must take the individuals wishes into account and measures must be put in place to support them. Whilst the purpose of risk assessments is to minimise risk we must also recognise the individual’s rights.
Looking at potential impact of risk taking, effective partnership working is essential, It is also important to ensure that policies and procedures such as Health and Safety and Adult Safeguarding are adhered to, so that risks are acceptable.

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