Poverty is a state of mind Great Britain’s financial situation is going downhill and leading the country into a bad crisis

Poverty is a state of mind

Great Britain’s financial situation is going downhill and leading the country into a bad crisis. The gap between the wealthy and poor has grown greatly over the last decade and is causing more inequality in the country. The poor aren’t able to sustain themselves and they are facing larger and more difficult challenges. Perhaps the challenges aren’t only about material wealth; perhaps the challenges are also about emotions and individuality, as Bernard Hare argues in his radio essay “Poverty is a state of mind” from 2012. But is this statement correct? Is poverty mostly in your mind? I will analyse the essay and focus on his use of the forms of appeal and his use of contrasts in the text.

Hare was born into poverty because his farther worked as a coal miner and his mother was a shop worker in a department store. The family did not have a lot of money because of the low wages, but they were proud of the fact that they paid their own way through life. Even though Hare was born into poverty, he never noticed it until he got older and realised his poor conditions “For the fist 10 years of my life, I had little idea that we were poor. As far as I was concerned, we had warmth, love, shelter, enough to eat (…) and a safe environment to run around and play in.” Because of his ignorance, he never felt alone, nor did he feel poor in spirit, which Hare thinks is the way the poorest people are feeling in the modern society. When the strike of the coal miners began, everything good about his hometown, Leeds, shattered. When the protests began, Hare began to do drugs, drink and smoke, entering a vicious spiral. When Hare later in his life meets a group of young people, who does exactly the same that he does when the protests began, Hare decides to help the children, called the Shed Crew. Hare claims that a vicious spiral of poverty is existing because money are spent, but not for the better “Absolute poverty was back with a vengeance.”